MARTHA STEWART'S HAIR LOOKS LIKE SHE WALKED INTO A CEILING FAN

Martha Stewart's Hair Look Like She Walked into a Ceiling Fan

GROWING UP, CULTURE MEANT REFINEMENT. WE TRIED TO CULTIVATE OURSELVES. It meant hiding our rough edges.
Young people today look like they style with trowels. Either they have long hair that's been electrocuted in blonde Spanish moss or is long, straight and stringy. We plummeted from refine to savage. Like history in reverse? Who programmed this ungodly ugliness?

Hair hanging down on your back is droopy. Better than stringy hair falling on your face. Television cameras pick up nervous Nellies constantly pushing hair behind their ears.

What we used to call our crowning glory is now a rag mop. Judy Ashworth, my friend the beauty shop magician, says fashion magazines and Hollywood set the style trends.

How many of us remember the Beautiful People? We idolized them. I go blind looking for good-looking American role models.



Anna Wintour, editor of Vogue magazine when I quoted her, said, "Sarah Jessica Parker influences fashion. I think her quirkiness and her sense of style has been fantastic for fashion. I think Venus and Serena Williams are great. I just love the outrageousness and their sense of style and how they completely turned around the way women look on the court."

Considered fashion's oracle, she continued, "On the highest couture level, I think Nicole Kidman can never put a step wrong. Going on to the red carpet for Nicole, she really thinks about it, she understands it, she knows what she represents in fashion."
Vogue tried out grunge in 1994 but saw it didn't work when the feedback from stores and consumers said they hated the look. Now, what does she like? "I love it when I see men in T-shirts under their dinner jackets at black-tie events." This from the fashion Bible?

"Seeing what girls are wearing on the street, you come back with 5,000 new ideas." I began calling her mag "Rogue."

In days of yore, fashion dictated. Street urchins did not a winner make. Couture shows in Europe were filled with sketchers who could take them back to Seventh Avenue in New Yawk so dressmakers could do "knock-offs." Only 20 percent of what's shown on the runway ever makes the showroom.

We used to have ahhhs. Now it's Oz and blahs. Cheapskate chic.

Models are pencil slim, like stick figures. Making fashion more like trashion. What to wear in a throwaway society?

If you don't see what you want, there's always Good Will.