FRENCH PARADOX PRAISES CHEESES FOR LONG LIVERS; ONE DOC SOLVES THIS PARADOX IN GRIND FINDS

People in France have remarkably low rates of cardiovascular disease despite the fact that they have a hey-day feasting on foods that hit high on the saturated fat meter.
By some researchers' estimates, 40% of their total calories come from saturated fats. You'd expect Parisiennes to drop like houseflies from heart disease. Some may blame the French fondness for red wine, which contains resveratrol, helps their hearts. Non! Inhabitants of other countries also drink lots of red wine but their heart health can't compare to Frenchmen.
Bottom Line contacted Ivan Petaev, MD, PhD., founder and CEO of a firm that conducted the research. Spiraling downward went levels of inflammation. Cheese also contains inhibitors of the ACE enzyme that controls blood pressure. Roquefort is considered good for heart health. Dr. Petyaev explained that more than half of adults, bacteria acting as "parasites" in the liver and blood vessels are responsible for increased cholesterol synthesis. Cheese also provides nutrients the body needs for good health --protein, calcium and vitamins A, D, B-6 and B-9.Here are the results of their tests: blue-veined cheeses such as Roquefort, Danish Blue, Gorgonzola and mature Stilton lead the pack. White fungi-fermented cheeses: Camenbert (from cow's or goat's  milk) and mature Brie.B





 Do as the continentals serving cheese; forget about pairing it with bread or crackers. place slivers of cheese on slices of apple or pear, tuck cheese ito celery sticks or sprinkle cheese over a chopped veggie salad. If you like your cheese melted, you have the good doctor's permission. Melting does not diminish its beneficial properties.