WSJ: Notable & Quotable: Dr. Jeffrey Singer Writing In The May Issue Of Reason Magazine


In the not-too-distant future, a small but healthy market will arise for cash-only, personalized, private care. For those who can afford it, there will always be competitive, market-driven clinics, hospitals, surgi-centers, and other arrangements -- including "medical tourism," whereby health care packages are offered at competitive rates in overseas medical centers.
Similar health markets already exist in areas such as Lasik eye surgery and cosmetic procedures. The medical profession will survive and even thrive in these small private niches. 
In other words, we're about to experience the two-tiered system that already exists in most parts of the world that provide "universal coverage." Those who have the financial means will still be able to get prompt, courteous, personalized, state-of-the-art healthcare from providers who consider themselves professionals. But the majority can expect long lines, mediocre and impersonal care from shift-working providers, subtle but definite rationing, and slowly deteriorating outcomes.
We already see this in Canada, where cash-only clinics are beginning to spring up, and the United Kingdom, where a small but healthy private system exists side-by-side with the National Health Service, providing high-end, fee-for-service, private health care, with little or no waiting.