BISCAYNE BAY YACHT CLUB SEA-L;EBRATES WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY WITH ANNUAL BLAST BENEATH MASTS

SEA-CRET SPOT FOR MEMBERS OF BISCAYNE BAY YACHT CLUB saw members
slip out from their boat slip to their" secret" landing place each year. This story ran Feb. 25, 1967. The headline was playful: "80 Candles Heat Chowder.
That tight little aristocratic ban, the Biscayne Bay Yacht Club, may have to take a powder with its annual charter Washington's Birthday Charter party.
They gathered at No Name Harbor to celebrate their annual birthday this week, a time-honored tradition for all those years plus one.
But neither rain nor high winds have fazed these folks, but they talked up a storm
this time because their picnic rendezvous may be off-limits next time.
There was Deering McCormick, using a bullhorn to call in the boats to dock. And Henry Germane, the club chef to cover his pots before swirling rain took place.
And all this landed gentry making entry into the snug harbor were wondering aloud, "Will we be back next year?"
On that historic site near Cape Florida, runs Pines Waterway, where rum runners used to rove. The state has until January 1968to exercise its option to buy beyond the waterway dividing line, the state has until January 1968 to exercise the its option to buy beyond the waterway dividing line additional land for Cape Florida State Park.
And as everyone knows, state parks post big signs about no gigs , no spears, no alcoholic beverages.
And the Biscayne Bay Yacht Clubbers do sip a few potables before and after Henry's famous chowder. At 1 p.m. the cannon is fired and they "dress ships." Then the commodores , past and present, march in their uniforms in the wake of a high-spirited band and start ladling the liquid lunch.
Commodore Sennett Duttenhofer and Vice Commodore Tom Johnson found 500 goers at the chow-down. A lot of people, a raft of boats. Where will they put out to sea if the new state park puts them at bay?